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IPPF ACRO-Adolescent Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America

Americas & the Caribbean

News item

Webinar | Adolescent Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America: Challenges 30 Years After the Belem Do Para Convention

A brief summary of what happened in the first session of our series of webinars.
IPPF ACRO-Adolescent Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America
news item

| 24 June 2024

Webinar | Adolescent Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America: Challenges 30 Years After the Belem Do Para Convention

Haz click aquí para leer esta noticia en español.   In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), one in five women marry or enter a union before the age of 18. This is the only region in the world where child marriage rates have hardly decreased over the past 25 years, and where informal unions without official registration are far more common than formal marriages. Given the relevance of addressing Child, Early, and Forced Marriages and Unions (CEFMU) in our region, IPPF ACRO has launched a series of webinars, “Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America”, to strengthen cross regional dialogue to promote comprehensive initiatives that put adolescents’ rights and autonomy at the centre.  The first of these sessions commemorated the 30th anniversary of the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment, and Eradication of Violence against Women, known as the Convention of Belém do Pará by analysing the situation of adolescent’s informal unions in the region and their link to discrimination and gender-based violence.   As a keynote speaker,  Dr. Gabrielle Hosein, researcher and academic from the Institute for Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies, shared the research she conducted from 2021 to 2023 on Child Marriage and Early Unions in the Caribbean commissioned by UNICEF under the Spotlight Initiatives Caribbean Regional Programme.    A gender-based violence issue  The Belém do Pará Convention is the main regional instrument to address violence against women as a violation of their human rights. Thirty years after the adoption, child marriages have been recognised as part of harmful practices, being both a cause and a consequence of gender-based violence against girls and adolescents. “It's still a challenge for all of us because despite all the commitments signed at the UN level, Child, Early, and Forced Marriages and Unions are still a barrier for many girls and young women, and it really has impeded their rights to be fulfilled,” Alessandra Nilo, IPPF ACRO’s External Relations Director, reflected when opening the session. Although these political commitments imply numerous intersectoral interventions – ensuring girls' access to education, sexual and reproductive health, and rights, ending gender stereotypes and gender-based violence, and ensuring equality before the law – government responses in the region have been limited mainly in raising the age of marriage to 18 years and eliminating exceptions. This response, although an important step, is insufficiently short in addressing the needs and situations that girls, adolescents and young women go through.    Zooming in on the Caribbean context  There is growing regional evidence about underlying drivers, manifestations and impacts of CEFMU on the girls who marry, as well as in their families and communities. However, there remains a large information gap on the situation in the Caribbean.   At the end of 2023, Dr. Gabrielle Hosein published a research brief that summarises the information available on CEFMU in the Caribbean and complements it with findings of research commissioned by UNICEF in the framework of the Spotlight Initiative Caribbean Regional Program, conducted in six Caribbean countries.  “It's really important in our region that we always keep the question of adolescent sexual agency in mind and adolescent agency overall, and that we don't simply think about adolescent girls as victims,” Dr. Hosein shared.   “In our region, early unions, which are primarily informal, tend to be entered into by girls themselves. That is, girls are not being forced or married off into unions as they might be in other places or sold into unions in the same rates as in other places.”  “None the less, girls are in disadvantage context, characterized by vulnerability, and they may enter unions for transactional exchange, for protection, to escape from family violence to secure support for their education and to experience intimacy.”  In this research, Dr. Hosein and colleagues found clear intersectionalities that emerge from the data and point to the need to focus on the vulnerability these populations have been put in. Any approach needs to recognize these structural factors.  Make sure you sign up to our newsletter to get information on the next webinars! Sign up here. 

IPPF ACRO-Adolescent Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America
news_item

| 24 June 2024

Webinar | Adolescent Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America: Challenges 30 Years After the Belem Do Para Convention

Haz click aquí para leer esta noticia en español.   In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), one in five women marry or enter a union before the age of 18. This is the only region in the world where child marriage rates have hardly decreased over the past 25 years, and where informal unions without official registration are far more common than formal marriages. Given the relevance of addressing Child, Early, and Forced Marriages and Unions (CEFMU) in our region, IPPF ACRO has launched a series of webinars, “Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America”, to strengthen cross regional dialogue to promote comprehensive initiatives that put adolescents’ rights and autonomy at the centre.  The first of these sessions commemorated the 30th anniversary of the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment, and Eradication of Violence against Women, known as the Convention of Belém do Pará by analysing the situation of adolescent’s informal unions in the region and their link to discrimination and gender-based violence.   As a keynote speaker,  Dr. Gabrielle Hosein, researcher and academic from the Institute for Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies, shared the research she conducted from 2021 to 2023 on Child Marriage and Early Unions in the Caribbean commissioned by UNICEF under the Spotlight Initiatives Caribbean Regional Programme.    A gender-based violence issue  The Belém do Pará Convention is the main regional instrument to address violence against women as a violation of their human rights. Thirty years after the adoption, child marriages have been recognised as part of harmful practices, being both a cause and a consequence of gender-based violence against girls and adolescents. “It's still a challenge for all of us because despite all the commitments signed at the UN level, Child, Early, and Forced Marriages and Unions are still a barrier for many girls and young women, and it really has impeded their rights to be fulfilled,” Alessandra Nilo, IPPF ACRO’s External Relations Director, reflected when opening the session. Although these political commitments imply numerous intersectoral interventions – ensuring girls' access to education, sexual and reproductive health, and rights, ending gender stereotypes and gender-based violence, and ensuring equality before the law – government responses in the region have been limited mainly in raising the age of marriage to 18 years and eliminating exceptions. This response, although an important step, is insufficiently short in addressing the needs and situations that girls, adolescents and young women go through.    Zooming in on the Caribbean context  There is growing regional evidence about underlying drivers, manifestations and impacts of CEFMU on the girls who marry, as well as in their families and communities. However, there remains a large information gap on the situation in the Caribbean.   At the end of 2023, Dr. Gabrielle Hosein published a research brief that summarises the information available on CEFMU in the Caribbean and complements it with findings of research commissioned by UNICEF in the framework of the Spotlight Initiative Caribbean Regional Program, conducted in six Caribbean countries.  “It's really important in our region that we always keep the question of adolescent sexual agency in mind and adolescent agency overall, and that we don't simply think about adolescent girls as victims,” Dr. Hosein shared.   “In our region, early unions, which are primarily informal, tend to be entered into by girls themselves. That is, girls are not being forced or married off into unions as they might be in other places or sold into unions in the same rates as in other places.”  “None the less, girls are in disadvantage context, characterized by vulnerability, and they may enter unions for transactional exchange, for protection, to escape from family violence to secure support for their education and to experience intimacy.”  In this research, Dr. Hosein and colleagues found clear intersectionalities that emerge from the data and point to the need to focus on the vulnerability these populations have been put in. Any approach needs to recognize these structural factors.  Make sure you sign up to our newsletter to get information on the next webinars! Sign up here. 

El Congreso brasileño vuelve a vulnerar los derechos de las mujeres, las niñas y las personas con útero
news item

| 17 June 2024

Brazilian Congress once again violates the rights of women, girls and people who have abortions

Haz click aquí para leer este posicionamiento en español. Clique aqui para ler essa posição em português.   Gestos, IPPF Collaborative Partner in Brazil, expresses its deep indignation at the urgent approval of Bill 1904/2024, which equates legal abortion and homicide if performed after 22 weeks of gestation. For such a bill to pass to the plenary for a vote, without being analysed by the Commissions of the Chamber of Deputies, is a direct attack on the rights of all women, girls and people who have abortions in Brazil.   The right to abortion is permitted in Brazil in three cases: risk to the life of the pregnant woman, pregnancy resulting from rape and anencephalic fetuses. This bill, which has the support of the Chamber President, Arthur Lira, represents another serious violation of rights, increasing the conditions of suffering and impotence. It is unjust, ineffective and will cause further damage to the health (including mental) of women, girls and pregnant people.  In Brazil, about 60% of rape cases occur against girls up to the age of 14. According to the Unified Health System (SUS), in 2022 there were more than 17,000 pregnancies of girls up to 14 years old, which represents an average of 39 girls giving birth every day. Data indicates that girls take longer to realise the violence they have suffered, most often committed by male family members, and do not immediately identify the pregnancy.   Brazil is already considered a country that has failed to guarantee the right to legal abortion. The last Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of Brazil conducted by the UN Human Rights Committee in September 2023 expressed serious concern about the violation of access to legal abortion in the country. Several recommendations made to the country call for the repeal of laws that criminalise people in need of legal abortion and the health professionals who assist them.  Civil society organisations, research institutes and the World Health Organisation itself have warned about the seriousness of the reversals in reproductive rights. In 2019, five years ago, Gestos launched the campaign "Legal abortion: don't judge, support", which highlighted the urgent need to offer support and solidarity to people who need abortions in the cases provided for by law.     There is no shortage of evidence that abortion is a public health issue and that it must be discussed considering the multiple structural inequalities faced by women, girls and people who have abortions. That is why we reject those representatives who, in the National Congress and/or in the different executive bodies, represent fundamentalism, sexism, misogyny and irresponsibility towards the people they are supposed to protect in their public functions.  For this reason, Gestos joins the different demonstrations and activities of feminist organisations, social movements and civil society: we will not stop until Bill 1904/2024 is stopped in Congress.        Gestos is a Collaborative Partner of IPPF in Brazil. Since1993 they have effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. They also help to form new civil society organizations, such as the National Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (RNPVHA - 1995), the Positive Work Group - GTP+ (2000), the Group of Positive Actions (2003), the Group of Support to HIV Positive People (GASP) 2003, Acts of Citizenship (2006). From 2007 to 2011, Gestos created and coordinated the UNGASS-AIDS Forum on Sexual and Reproductive Health, where it oversaw the implementation of agreements signed at the UN in sixteen developing countries. The UNGASS-AIDS Forum has established itself as a space for political debate on issues related to HIV and AIDS and sexual and reproductive health and rights. They are also a consultative NGO at the UN, with ECOSOC status since 2017.     

El Congreso brasileño vuelve a vulnerar los derechos de las mujeres, las niñas y las personas con útero
news_item

| 17 June 2024

Brazilian Congress once again violates the rights of women, girls and people who have abortions

Haz click aquí para leer este posicionamiento en español. Clique aqui para ler essa posição em português.   Gestos, IPPF Collaborative Partner in Brazil, expresses its deep indignation at the urgent approval of Bill 1904/2024, which equates legal abortion and homicide if performed after 22 weeks of gestation. For such a bill to pass to the plenary for a vote, without being analysed by the Commissions of the Chamber of Deputies, is a direct attack on the rights of all women, girls and people who have abortions in Brazil.   The right to abortion is permitted in Brazil in three cases: risk to the life of the pregnant woman, pregnancy resulting from rape and anencephalic fetuses. This bill, which has the support of the Chamber President, Arthur Lira, represents another serious violation of rights, increasing the conditions of suffering and impotence. It is unjust, ineffective and will cause further damage to the health (including mental) of women, girls and pregnant people.  In Brazil, about 60% of rape cases occur against girls up to the age of 14. According to the Unified Health System (SUS), in 2022 there were more than 17,000 pregnancies of girls up to 14 years old, which represents an average of 39 girls giving birth every day. Data indicates that girls take longer to realise the violence they have suffered, most often committed by male family members, and do not immediately identify the pregnancy.   Brazil is already considered a country that has failed to guarantee the right to legal abortion. The last Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of Brazil conducted by the UN Human Rights Committee in September 2023 expressed serious concern about the violation of access to legal abortion in the country. Several recommendations made to the country call for the repeal of laws that criminalise people in need of legal abortion and the health professionals who assist them.  Civil society organisations, research institutes and the World Health Organisation itself have warned about the seriousness of the reversals in reproductive rights. In 2019, five years ago, Gestos launched the campaign "Legal abortion: don't judge, support", which highlighted the urgent need to offer support and solidarity to people who need abortions in the cases provided for by law.     There is no shortage of evidence that abortion is a public health issue and that it must be discussed considering the multiple structural inequalities faced by women, girls and people who have abortions. That is why we reject those representatives who, in the National Congress and/or in the different executive bodies, represent fundamentalism, sexism, misogyny and irresponsibility towards the people they are supposed to protect in their public functions.  For this reason, Gestos joins the different demonstrations and activities of feminist organisations, social movements and civil society: we will not stop until Bill 1904/2024 is stopped in Congress.        Gestos is a Collaborative Partner of IPPF in Brazil. Since1993 they have effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. They also help to form new civil society organizations, such as the National Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (RNPVHA - 1995), the Positive Work Group - GTP+ (2000), the Group of Positive Actions (2003), the Group of Support to HIV Positive People (GASP) 2003, Acts of Citizenship (2006). From 2007 to 2011, Gestos created and coordinated the UNGASS-AIDS Forum on Sexual and Reproductive Health, where it oversaw the implementation of agreements signed at the UN in sixteen developing countries. The UNGASS-AIDS Forum has established itself as a space for political debate on issues related to HIV and AIDS and sexual and reproductive health and rights. They are also a consultative NGO at the UN, with ECOSOC status since 2017.     

IPPF May News
news item

| 31 May 2024

May News Round-Up

Haz click aquí para leer el Resumen de noticias de mayo en español. Brazil | Gestos celebrates 31 years of advocating for SRHR   Gestos, IPPF Collaborative Partner in Brazil, celebrated their 31st anniversary with dance, music and much love from their community. Since their founding, they have advocated to link social, cultural, economic and environmental issues to inclusive and effective public policies on sexual and reproductive health and rights.  For 31 years, Gestos has effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. Around 70 per cent of the people who have sought legal support from the institution have had their rights repaired, through injunctions and judgements. Gestos' advocacy efforts effectively reach multilateral bodies dedicated to monitoring HIV, gender, sexual rights and public development policies and, since 2001, the organisation has been monitoring United Nations resolutions on these agendas.  Congratulations, parceiras!       Bolivia | Colectivo Rebeldía celebrates diverse 🏳️‍🌈 🏳️‍⚧️ families for IDAHOBIT  To commemorate the International Day Against LGBTIphobia, Colectivo Rebeldía,  Collaborative Partner in Bolivia, joined the Sexual Diversity Movement of Santa Cruz to celebrate love and diversity on May 17th. They brought the community together to celebrate all forms of love and all forms of families. The cold weather was no obstacle to this warm and welcoming gathering where they shared moments of reflection, art and connection.  You can learn more about this joint project with their most recent (and creative!) post.      Cuba | Cenesex fights LGBTQI-Phobia with gala, march and community-oriented events  IPPF Collaborative Partner in Cuba, Cenesex, went all out for IDAHOBIT celebrations with the Cuban Days Against Homophobia and Transphobia during the month of May. They took the streets to the rhythm of the Cuban Conga against Homophobia and Transphobia, waving the trans and transinclusive pride flag across San José de las Lajas. They also celebrated the graduation of 30 transgender people as Sexual Health and Rights promoters in prisons. Their community work is incredible!      Dominica | Dominica Planned Parenthood Association champions gender equality at SIDS4  From May 27-30 the Dominican Planned Parenthood Association participated in the 4th International Conference on Small Island Developing States. This year, Antigua & Barbuda was host to leaders from the 39 independent States and 18 Associate Members of United Nations regional commissions and other world leaders, officials, and experts from the private sector, academia and civil society. DPPA participated in the Gender Equality Forum as part of the SIDS4, bringing forward the importance of addressing gender-based violence.      Haïti | The Association of Midwifes of Haiti highlights the important role of midwives at the forefront of crisis.   To celebrate the International Day of the Midwife, on May 6th the Association des Sages-Femmes d’Haïti (ASFH) organized the webinar “Midwives in Haïti: Agents of Solution in the Socio-political Crisis”, of particular importance in the country’s current context. Key stakeholders came together to discuss best practices, challenges and solutions to strengthen maternal and child health in the country. It was a relevant virtual platform for reflection, exchange of ideas and collective action.      Perú | INPPARES and IPPF ACRO express concern regarding the latest Health Ministry’s decree that violates LGBTQI+ rights.  The IPPF Americas and Caribbean Regional Office joined INPPARES, IPPF Member Association in Peru, in expressing its rejection of the Supreme Decree Nº 009-2024-SA issued on May 10th by the Peruvian Ministry of Health which, by updating the Essential Health Insurance Plan (PEAS) based on the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), violates the human rights of LGBTIQ+ people.  This decision of the Peruvian government to use ICD-10 is very serious, as it violates binding codes and agreements at local, regional and international level. You can read our joint statement here.     If you want to receive SRHR news directly from the ground to your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter Rising the Tide: Subscribe

IPPF May News
news_item

| 31 May 2024

May News Round-Up

Haz click aquí para leer el Resumen de noticias de mayo en español. Brazil | Gestos celebrates 31 years of advocating for SRHR   Gestos, IPPF Collaborative Partner in Brazil, celebrated their 31st anniversary with dance, music and much love from their community. Since their founding, they have advocated to link social, cultural, economic and environmental issues to inclusive and effective public policies on sexual and reproductive health and rights.  For 31 years, Gestos has effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. Around 70 per cent of the people who have sought legal support from the institution have had their rights repaired, through injunctions and judgements. Gestos' advocacy efforts effectively reach multilateral bodies dedicated to monitoring HIV, gender, sexual rights and public development policies and, since 2001, the organisation has been monitoring United Nations resolutions on these agendas.  Congratulations, parceiras!       Bolivia | Colectivo Rebeldía celebrates diverse 🏳️‍🌈 🏳️‍⚧️ families for IDAHOBIT  To commemorate the International Day Against LGBTIphobia, Colectivo Rebeldía,  Collaborative Partner in Bolivia, joined the Sexual Diversity Movement of Santa Cruz to celebrate love and diversity on May 17th. They brought the community together to celebrate all forms of love and all forms of families. The cold weather was no obstacle to this warm and welcoming gathering where they shared moments of reflection, art and connection.  You can learn more about this joint project with their most recent (and creative!) post.      Cuba | Cenesex fights LGBTQI-Phobia with gala, march and community-oriented events  IPPF Collaborative Partner in Cuba, Cenesex, went all out for IDAHOBIT celebrations with the Cuban Days Against Homophobia and Transphobia during the month of May. They took the streets to the rhythm of the Cuban Conga against Homophobia and Transphobia, waving the trans and transinclusive pride flag across San José de las Lajas. They also celebrated the graduation of 30 transgender people as Sexual Health and Rights promoters in prisons. Their community work is incredible!      Dominica | Dominica Planned Parenthood Association champions gender equality at SIDS4  From May 27-30 the Dominican Planned Parenthood Association participated in the 4th International Conference on Small Island Developing States. This year, Antigua & Barbuda was host to leaders from the 39 independent States and 18 Associate Members of United Nations regional commissions and other world leaders, officials, and experts from the private sector, academia and civil society. DPPA participated in the Gender Equality Forum as part of the SIDS4, bringing forward the importance of addressing gender-based violence.      Haïti | The Association of Midwifes of Haiti highlights the important role of midwives at the forefront of crisis.   To celebrate the International Day of the Midwife, on May 6th the Association des Sages-Femmes d’Haïti (ASFH) organized the webinar “Midwives in Haïti: Agents of Solution in the Socio-political Crisis”, of particular importance in the country’s current context. Key stakeholders came together to discuss best practices, challenges and solutions to strengthen maternal and child health in the country. It was a relevant virtual platform for reflection, exchange of ideas and collective action.      Perú | INPPARES and IPPF ACRO express concern regarding the latest Health Ministry’s decree that violates LGBTQI+ rights.  The IPPF Americas and Caribbean Regional Office joined INPPARES, IPPF Member Association in Peru, in expressing its rejection of the Supreme Decree Nº 009-2024-SA issued on May 10th by the Peruvian Ministry of Health which, by updating the Essential Health Insurance Plan (PEAS) based on the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), violates the human rights of LGBTIQ+ people.  This decision of the Peruvian government to use ICD-10 is very serious, as it violates binding codes and agreements at local, regional and international level. You can read our joint statement here.     If you want to receive SRHR news directly from the ground to your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter Rising the Tide: Subscribe

Inundaciones en Rio Grande do Sul: una mirada sobre las mujeres y el cambio climático
news item

| 16 May 2024

Floods in Rio Grande do Sul: a look at women and climate change

Clique aqui para ler em português. Click aquí para leer en español.   Gestos expresses deep solidarity and concern about the current situation faced by the state of Rio Grande do Sul. We know that climate disasters disproportionately affect populations in situations of social vulnerability and these circumstances demand, more than ever, a watchful eye and firm gestures to guarantee rights. Based on the lessons learned, it is urgent to move towards the implementation of effective public policies that protect people in situations of humanitarian crises as intense as the one experienced these days in the south of the country. Thus, it was with great indignation and concern that we became aware of the cases of sexual abuse of women displaced by the catastrophe in shelters, all of them under 18 years of age. As has been proven and documented in similar situations, what has happened raises the alarm that official complaints represent only a small fraction of the cases of harassment that have occurred. Sexual violence related to climate events has long been documented and its prevention requires immediate attention from local authorities. It is widely known and has been discussed in various international spaces with data showing that humanitarian responses require a gendered approach, requiring protective measures to be put in place. UN data already shows that women are 14 times more likely to die in climate disasters than men. There is no lack of evidence, but once again the attention of the public authorities to the situation of women has been lacking. This is unacceptable and the extreme vulnerability of women and girls to climate change has been highlighted by civil society organisations, including Gestos, and by different UN agencies in multilateral forums. In times of tragedy, solidarity manifests itself, but there are also gaps for multiple violations. Reports from partners living in the state also indicate the neglect of the protection of people's sexual and reproductive rights, as well as episodes of transphobia, the breakdown of secrecy about HIV status and the adoption of segregating and stigmatising strategies during the crisis, such as the forced separation of people affected by tuberculosis in specific places. Concern must go beyond the structural and material reconstruction of the state. It is urgent to allocate resources to develop a contingency plan capable of mitigating the impacts of the crisis on populations - impacts that are not yet measurable.   Gestos remains available to contribute in whatever way possible to strengthen this powerful network of support and solidarity. You too can contribute by consulting the list of serious partnerships that have made a difference in the lives of hundreds of people.   How to help:   Gestos is a Collaborative Partner of IPPF in Brazil. Since1993 they have effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. They also help to form new civil society organizations, such as the National Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (RNPVHA - 1995), the Positive Work Group - GTP+ (2000), the Group of Positive Actions (2003), the Group of Support to HIV Positive People (GASP) 2003, Acts of Citizenship (2006). From 2007 to 2011, Gestos created and coordinated the UNGASS-AIDS Forum on Sexual and Reproductive Health, where it oversaw the implementation of agreements signed at the UN in sixteen developing countries. The UNGASS-AIDS Forum has established itself as a space for political debate on issues related to HIV and AIDS and sexual and reproductive health and rights. They are also a consultative NGO at the UN, with ECOSOC status since 2017.

Inundaciones en Rio Grande do Sul: una mirada sobre las mujeres y el cambio climático
news_item

| 16 May 2024

Floods in Rio Grande do Sul: a look at women and climate change

Clique aqui para ler em português. Click aquí para leer en español.   Gestos expresses deep solidarity and concern about the current situation faced by the state of Rio Grande do Sul. We know that climate disasters disproportionately affect populations in situations of social vulnerability and these circumstances demand, more than ever, a watchful eye and firm gestures to guarantee rights. Based on the lessons learned, it is urgent to move towards the implementation of effective public policies that protect people in situations of humanitarian crises as intense as the one experienced these days in the south of the country. Thus, it was with great indignation and concern that we became aware of the cases of sexual abuse of women displaced by the catastrophe in shelters, all of them under 18 years of age. As has been proven and documented in similar situations, what has happened raises the alarm that official complaints represent only a small fraction of the cases of harassment that have occurred. Sexual violence related to climate events has long been documented and its prevention requires immediate attention from local authorities. It is widely known and has been discussed in various international spaces with data showing that humanitarian responses require a gendered approach, requiring protective measures to be put in place. UN data already shows that women are 14 times more likely to die in climate disasters than men. There is no lack of evidence, but once again the attention of the public authorities to the situation of women has been lacking. This is unacceptable and the extreme vulnerability of women and girls to climate change has been highlighted by civil society organisations, including Gestos, and by different UN agencies in multilateral forums. In times of tragedy, solidarity manifests itself, but there are also gaps for multiple violations. Reports from partners living in the state also indicate the neglect of the protection of people's sexual and reproductive rights, as well as episodes of transphobia, the breakdown of secrecy about HIV status and the adoption of segregating and stigmatising strategies during the crisis, such as the forced separation of people affected by tuberculosis in specific places. Concern must go beyond the structural and material reconstruction of the state. It is urgent to allocate resources to develop a contingency plan capable of mitigating the impacts of the crisis on populations - impacts that are not yet measurable.   Gestos remains available to contribute in whatever way possible to strengthen this powerful network of support and solidarity. You too can contribute by consulting the list of serious partnerships that have made a difference in the lives of hundreds of people.   How to help:   Gestos is a Collaborative Partner of IPPF in Brazil. Since1993 they have effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. They also help to form new civil society organizations, such as the National Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (RNPVHA - 1995), the Positive Work Group - GTP+ (2000), the Group of Positive Actions (2003), the Group of Support to HIV Positive People (GASP) 2003, Acts of Citizenship (2006). From 2007 to 2011, Gestos created and coordinated the UNGASS-AIDS Forum on Sexual and Reproductive Health, where it oversaw the implementation of agreements signed at the UN in sixteen developing countries. The UNGASS-AIDS Forum has established itself as a space for political debate on issues related to HIV and AIDS and sexual and reproductive health and rights. They are also a consultative NGO at the UN, with ECOSOC status since 2017.

In powerful speech, IPPF urges governments to deliver on the ICPD’s Programme of Action at the 57th Commission on Population and Development
news item

| 06 May 2024

IPPF urges governments to deliver on the ICPD’s Programme of Action

Para ver este contenido en español, haz click aquí. During the 57th Commission on Population and Development, Eugenia López Uribe, Regional Director at IPPF Americas and the Caribbean, delivered an oral statement to exhort governments to invest on realising the International Conference on Population and Development’s Programme of Action, signed in 1994 in Cairo, Egypt.     Watch the oral statement here. “Thirty years ago, the world looked more promising – Nelson Mandela was to be elected President of South Africa. The internet was created. Israel signed an accord with Palestinians. Although, still, there was war in Europe, climate change was wreaking havoc, women and girls were experiencing violence, dying from preventable maternal mortality, and being denied full autonomy.   Today, despite progress and additional international commitments, the data from SDG indicators shows that globally only 56% of women can make decisions about their sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights; one in five are married before the age of 18,2 and 1 in 3 experience sexual or GVB in their lifetime, mostly from an intimate partner; more than one billion have unmet needs for family planning; half of all pregnancies, 121 million/ year, are unintended.   Reductions in maternal mortality have worsened since 2016. Multiple ongoing crises including climate change, exacerbated the impact of deprioritized, insufficient SRH services, particularly in conflict situations.   Although decision-makers know what needs to be done – there is an abundance of evidence before us – both policy implementation and adequate resourcing of the ICPD PoA is falling short of the goals set in 1994.   At this critical moment for the UN system, we see strong attacks against the 2030 Agenda and the long-held consensus that reproductive rights are human rights and a matter of development. Those trying to undermine these rights are aligned with those trying to undermine democracy, science, civic space and the multilateral system itself. The global community must stop them to continue using human rights as a weapon, instead of a shield, institutionalizing discrimination and hatred into laws and communities, and slowing global progress in areas like maternal mortality and HIV, where we see an increase for adolescent girls.   The ICPD PoA is essential to any Post-2030 future, but it requires adequate financing and system-wide policy coherence and coordination amongst all stakeholders at national and international levels: the ODA commitments must be fulfilled; the elimination of systemic barriers and the promotion of integrated rights must guide the economic policies, mainstreaming gender and race equality and environmental integrity.   And young people, feminists, adolescents, and civil society must be guaranteed space to be heard at national, as well at the UN levels; the populations who have been pushed furthest behind must be prioritized.   We welcome that Member States reaffirmed at the UN their support for the ICPD 30 years on. But we also call on you to increase the speed to make this agenda a reality: you can do better to protect the rights of women, girls, adolescents, and young people in all our diversity. It is our lives, our bodies that pay the price of inaction, or not enough action, and we have paid it for long enough.”  IPPF ACRO is deeply committed to the realisation of the ICPD’s Programme of Action and will continue to meaningfully engage in spaces like the Commission on Population and Development to drive governments and stakeholder to factually deliver on guaranteeing human rights for all.    

In powerful speech, IPPF urges governments to deliver on the ICPD’s Programme of Action at the 57th Commission on Population and Development
news_item

| 02 May 2024

IPPF urges governments to deliver on the ICPD’s Programme of Action

Para ver este contenido en español, haz click aquí. During the 57th Commission on Population and Development, Eugenia López Uribe, Regional Director at IPPF Americas and the Caribbean, delivered an oral statement to exhort governments to invest on realising the International Conference on Population and Development’s Programme of Action, signed in 1994 in Cairo, Egypt.     Watch the oral statement here. “Thirty years ago, the world looked more promising – Nelson Mandela was to be elected President of South Africa. The internet was created. Israel signed an accord with Palestinians. Although, still, there was war in Europe, climate change was wreaking havoc, women and girls were experiencing violence, dying from preventable maternal mortality, and being denied full autonomy.   Today, despite progress and additional international commitments, the data from SDG indicators shows that globally only 56% of women can make decisions about their sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights; one in five are married before the age of 18,2 and 1 in 3 experience sexual or GVB in their lifetime, mostly from an intimate partner; more than one billion have unmet needs for family planning; half of all pregnancies, 121 million/ year, are unintended.   Reductions in maternal mortality have worsened since 2016. Multiple ongoing crises including climate change, exacerbated the impact of deprioritized, insufficient SRH services, particularly in conflict situations.   Although decision-makers know what needs to be done – there is an abundance of evidence before us – both policy implementation and adequate resourcing of the ICPD PoA is falling short of the goals set in 1994.   At this critical moment for the UN system, we see strong attacks against the 2030 Agenda and the long-held consensus that reproductive rights are human rights and a matter of development. Those trying to undermine these rights are aligned with those trying to undermine democracy, science, civic space and the multilateral system itself. The global community must stop them to continue using human rights as a weapon, instead of a shield, institutionalizing discrimination and hatred into laws and communities, and slowing global progress in areas like maternal mortality and HIV, where we see an increase for adolescent girls.   The ICPD PoA is essential to any Post-2030 future, but it requires adequate financing and system-wide policy coherence and coordination amongst all stakeholders at national and international levels: the ODA commitments must be fulfilled; the elimination of systemic barriers and the promotion of integrated rights must guide the economic policies, mainstreaming gender and race equality and environmental integrity.   And young people, feminists, adolescents, and civil society must be guaranteed space to be heard at national, as well at the UN levels; the populations who have been pushed furthest behind must be prioritized.   We welcome that Member States reaffirmed at the UN their support for the ICPD 30 years on. But we also call on you to increase the speed to make this agenda a reality: you can do better to protect the rights of women, girls, adolescents, and young people in all our diversity. It is our lives, our bodies that pay the price of inaction, or not enough action, and we have paid it for long enough.”  IPPF ACRO is deeply committed to the realisation of the ICPD’s Programme of Action and will continue to meaningfully engage in spaces like the Commission on Population and Development to drive governments and stakeholder to factually deliver on guaranteeing human rights for all.    

April News Round-Up
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| 06 May 2024

April News Round-Up

Haz click aquí para leer esta entrada en español. ACRO Youth Network participated in the Workshop Planning and Advocacy facilitated by FP2030 Latin America and the Caribbean Hub    Ela Urquijo, ACRO Youth Networker and Nikoli Edwards, Youth Officer at the Family Planning Association of Trinidad and Tobago attended FP2030 LAC Hub's Planning and Advocacy Workshop where they explored and learnt about sexual and reproductive rights from different perspectives and sectors.  IPPF ACRO Youth Network is the network of young volunteers that engage together to fight for sexual and reproductive rights in the Americas and the Caribbean. Each member of the IPPF ACRO Youth Network is also part of IPPF’s Member Association in their country. Join them in their activism for SRHR here.  FP2030 is a global alliance to empower women, young women, adolescents, and girls through the mobilization of family planning policies, investments and actions based on the sexual and reproductive rights policies, investments and actions. The Latin America and the Caribbean Hub is hosted by Profamilia Colombia and Save the Children.     Collaborative Partner in Argentina joins thousands in standing up for free and accessible education    Fundheg, Collaborative Partner in Argentina, joined the public marches in support of the Public Universities in their country. They raised their voices against the economic and financial adjustments proposed by the national government, which endanger the right of young people to have access to public higher education of excellence, without fees and with free admission.  These financial adjustments are part of a series of decrees and changes proposed by the Federal Government which intend to hinder the advancement of human rights in the country.     IPPF ACRO participates in the VII Latin America and the Caribbean Countries Forum on Sustainable Development    IPPF ACRO participated in the Latin America and the Caribbean Countries Forum and co-hosted the event “Climate Change and Health: the double challenge of our time” where Eugenia López Uribe, Regional Director of IPPF Americas and the Caribbean stressed the linkages between Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and Climate Change.    The effects of the climate crisis become barriers to people's access to sexual and reproductive health services, such as contraception, access to safe abortion, and pregnancy care, to name a few. Together with Gestos, Collaborative Partner in Brazil, UNAIDS, the CSO Working Group on 2030 Agenda and Fiocruz Foundation, IPPF ACRO positioned SRHR as vital to address climate change.    Saint Vincent Planned Parenthood Association hosts fundraising event for children   In efforts to support children who face challenges in accessing school supplies and essentials such as stationary, backpacks, hygiene kits and uniforms the St Vincent Planned Parenthood Association hosted a fundraising BBQ. SVPPA recognizes that education is the cornerstone of a bright future and launched this heartfelt fundraising to support children struggling with education supplies.     If you want to receive SRHR news directly from the ground to your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter "Rising the Tide"!

April News Round-Up
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| 30 April 2024

April News Round-Up

Haz click aquí para leer esta entrada en español. ACRO Youth Network participated in the Workshop Planning and Advocacy facilitated by FP2030 Latin America and the Caribbean Hub    Ela Urquijo, ACRO Youth Networker and Nikoli Edwards, Youth Officer at the Family Planning Association of Trinidad and Tobago attended FP2030 LAC Hub's Planning and Advocacy Workshop where they explored and learnt about sexual and reproductive rights from different perspectives and sectors.  IPPF ACRO Youth Network is the network of young volunteers that engage together to fight for sexual and reproductive rights in the Americas and the Caribbean. Each member of the IPPF ACRO Youth Network is also part of IPPF’s Member Association in their country. Join them in their activism for SRHR here.  FP2030 is a global alliance to empower women, young women, adolescents, and girls through the mobilization of family planning policies, investments and actions based on the sexual and reproductive rights policies, investments and actions. The Latin America and the Caribbean Hub is hosted by Profamilia Colombia and Save the Children.     Collaborative Partner in Argentina joins thousands in standing up for free and accessible education    Fundheg, Collaborative Partner in Argentina, joined the public marches in support of the Public Universities in their country. They raised their voices against the economic and financial adjustments proposed by the national government, which endanger the right of young people to have access to public higher education of excellence, without fees and with free admission.  These financial adjustments are part of a series of decrees and changes proposed by the Federal Government which intend to hinder the advancement of human rights in the country.     IPPF ACRO participates in the VII Latin America and the Caribbean Countries Forum on Sustainable Development    IPPF ACRO participated in the Latin America and the Caribbean Countries Forum and co-hosted the event “Climate Change and Health: the double challenge of our time” where Eugenia López Uribe, Regional Director of IPPF Americas and the Caribbean stressed the linkages between Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and Climate Change.    The effects of the climate crisis become barriers to people's access to sexual and reproductive health services, such as contraception, access to safe abortion, and pregnancy care, to name a few. Together with Gestos, Collaborative Partner in Brazil, UNAIDS, the CSO Working Group on 2030 Agenda and Fiocruz Foundation, IPPF ACRO positioned SRHR as vital to address climate change.    Saint Vincent Planned Parenthood Association hosts fundraising event for children   In efforts to support children who face challenges in accessing school supplies and essentials such as stationary, backpacks, hygiene kits and uniforms the St Vincent Planned Parenthood Association hosted a fundraising BBQ. SVPPA recognizes that education is the cornerstone of a bright future and launched this heartfelt fundraising to support children struggling with education supplies.     If you want to receive SRHR news directly from the ground to your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter "Rising the Tide"!

IPPF ACRO-Adolescent Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America
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| 24 June 2024

Webinar | Adolescent Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America: Challenges 30 Years After the Belem Do Para Convention

Haz click aquí para leer esta noticia en español.   In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), one in five women marry or enter a union before the age of 18. This is the only region in the world where child marriage rates have hardly decreased over the past 25 years, and where informal unions without official registration are far more common than formal marriages. Given the relevance of addressing Child, Early, and Forced Marriages and Unions (CEFMU) in our region, IPPF ACRO has launched a series of webinars, “Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America”, to strengthen cross regional dialogue to promote comprehensive initiatives that put adolescents’ rights and autonomy at the centre.  The first of these sessions commemorated the 30th anniversary of the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment, and Eradication of Violence against Women, known as the Convention of Belém do Pará by analysing the situation of adolescent’s informal unions in the region and their link to discrimination and gender-based violence.   As a keynote speaker,  Dr. Gabrielle Hosein, researcher and academic from the Institute for Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies, shared the research she conducted from 2021 to 2023 on Child Marriage and Early Unions in the Caribbean commissioned by UNICEF under the Spotlight Initiatives Caribbean Regional Programme.    A gender-based violence issue  The Belém do Pará Convention is the main regional instrument to address violence against women as a violation of their human rights. Thirty years after the adoption, child marriages have been recognised as part of harmful practices, being both a cause and a consequence of gender-based violence against girls and adolescents. “It's still a challenge for all of us because despite all the commitments signed at the UN level, Child, Early, and Forced Marriages and Unions are still a barrier for many girls and young women, and it really has impeded their rights to be fulfilled,” Alessandra Nilo, IPPF ACRO’s External Relations Director, reflected when opening the session. Although these political commitments imply numerous intersectoral interventions – ensuring girls' access to education, sexual and reproductive health, and rights, ending gender stereotypes and gender-based violence, and ensuring equality before the law – government responses in the region have been limited mainly in raising the age of marriage to 18 years and eliminating exceptions. This response, although an important step, is insufficiently short in addressing the needs and situations that girls, adolescents and young women go through.    Zooming in on the Caribbean context  There is growing regional evidence about underlying drivers, manifestations and impacts of CEFMU on the girls who marry, as well as in their families and communities. However, there remains a large information gap on the situation in the Caribbean.   At the end of 2023, Dr. Gabrielle Hosein published a research brief that summarises the information available on CEFMU in the Caribbean and complements it with findings of research commissioned by UNICEF in the framework of the Spotlight Initiative Caribbean Regional Program, conducted in six Caribbean countries.  “It's really important in our region that we always keep the question of adolescent sexual agency in mind and adolescent agency overall, and that we don't simply think about adolescent girls as victims,” Dr. Hosein shared.   “In our region, early unions, which are primarily informal, tend to be entered into by girls themselves. That is, girls are not being forced or married off into unions as they might be in other places or sold into unions in the same rates as in other places.”  “None the less, girls are in disadvantage context, characterized by vulnerability, and they may enter unions for transactional exchange, for protection, to escape from family violence to secure support for their education and to experience intimacy.”  In this research, Dr. Hosein and colleagues found clear intersectionalities that emerge from the data and point to the need to focus on the vulnerability these populations have been put in. Any approach needs to recognize these structural factors.  Make sure you sign up to our newsletter to get information on the next webinars! Sign up here. 

IPPF ACRO-Adolescent Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America
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| 24 June 2024

Webinar | Adolescent Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America: Challenges 30 Years After the Belem Do Para Convention

Haz click aquí para leer esta noticia en español.   In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), one in five women marry or enter a union before the age of 18. This is the only region in the world where child marriage rates have hardly decreased over the past 25 years, and where informal unions without official registration are far more common than formal marriages. Given the relevance of addressing Child, Early, and Forced Marriages and Unions (CEFMU) in our region, IPPF ACRO has launched a series of webinars, “Informal Unions in the Caribbean and Latin America”, to strengthen cross regional dialogue to promote comprehensive initiatives that put adolescents’ rights and autonomy at the centre.  The first of these sessions commemorated the 30th anniversary of the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment, and Eradication of Violence against Women, known as the Convention of Belém do Pará by analysing the situation of adolescent’s informal unions in the region and their link to discrimination and gender-based violence.   As a keynote speaker,  Dr. Gabrielle Hosein, researcher and academic from the Institute for Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies, shared the research she conducted from 2021 to 2023 on Child Marriage and Early Unions in the Caribbean commissioned by UNICEF under the Spotlight Initiatives Caribbean Regional Programme.    A gender-based violence issue  The Belém do Pará Convention is the main regional instrument to address violence against women as a violation of their human rights. Thirty years after the adoption, child marriages have been recognised as part of harmful practices, being both a cause and a consequence of gender-based violence against girls and adolescents. “It's still a challenge for all of us because despite all the commitments signed at the UN level, Child, Early, and Forced Marriages and Unions are still a barrier for many girls and young women, and it really has impeded their rights to be fulfilled,” Alessandra Nilo, IPPF ACRO’s External Relations Director, reflected when opening the session. Although these political commitments imply numerous intersectoral interventions – ensuring girls' access to education, sexual and reproductive health, and rights, ending gender stereotypes and gender-based violence, and ensuring equality before the law – government responses in the region have been limited mainly in raising the age of marriage to 18 years and eliminating exceptions. This response, although an important step, is insufficiently short in addressing the needs and situations that girls, adolescents and young women go through.    Zooming in on the Caribbean context  There is growing regional evidence about underlying drivers, manifestations and impacts of CEFMU on the girls who marry, as well as in their families and communities. However, there remains a large information gap on the situation in the Caribbean.   At the end of 2023, Dr. Gabrielle Hosein published a research brief that summarises the information available on CEFMU in the Caribbean and complements it with findings of research commissioned by UNICEF in the framework of the Spotlight Initiative Caribbean Regional Program, conducted in six Caribbean countries.  “It's really important in our region that we always keep the question of adolescent sexual agency in mind and adolescent agency overall, and that we don't simply think about adolescent girls as victims,” Dr. Hosein shared.   “In our region, early unions, which are primarily informal, tend to be entered into by girls themselves. That is, girls are not being forced or married off into unions as they might be in other places or sold into unions in the same rates as in other places.”  “None the less, girls are in disadvantage context, characterized by vulnerability, and they may enter unions for transactional exchange, for protection, to escape from family violence to secure support for their education and to experience intimacy.”  In this research, Dr. Hosein and colleagues found clear intersectionalities that emerge from the data and point to the need to focus on the vulnerability these populations have been put in. Any approach needs to recognize these structural factors.  Make sure you sign up to our newsletter to get information on the next webinars! Sign up here. 

El Congreso brasileño vuelve a vulnerar los derechos de las mujeres, las niñas y las personas con útero
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| 17 June 2024

Brazilian Congress once again violates the rights of women, girls and people who have abortions

Haz click aquí para leer este posicionamiento en español. Clique aqui para ler essa posição em português.   Gestos, IPPF Collaborative Partner in Brazil, expresses its deep indignation at the urgent approval of Bill 1904/2024, which equates legal abortion and homicide if performed after 22 weeks of gestation. For such a bill to pass to the plenary for a vote, without being analysed by the Commissions of the Chamber of Deputies, is a direct attack on the rights of all women, girls and people who have abortions in Brazil.   The right to abortion is permitted in Brazil in three cases: risk to the life of the pregnant woman, pregnancy resulting from rape and anencephalic fetuses. This bill, which has the support of the Chamber President, Arthur Lira, represents another serious violation of rights, increasing the conditions of suffering and impotence. It is unjust, ineffective and will cause further damage to the health (including mental) of women, girls and pregnant people.  In Brazil, about 60% of rape cases occur against girls up to the age of 14. According to the Unified Health System (SUS), in 2022 there were more than 17,000 pregnancies of girls up to 14 years old, which represents an average of 39 girls giving birth every day. Data indicates that girls take longer to realise the violence they have suffered, most often committed by male family members, and do not immediately identify the pregnancy.   Brazil is already considered a country that has failed to guarantee the right to legal abortion. The last Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of Brazil conducted by the UN Human Rights Committee in September 2023 expressed serious concern about the violation of access to legal abortion in the country. Several recommendations made to the country call for the repeal of laws that criminalise people in need of legal abortion and the health professionals who assist them.  Civil society organisations, research institutes and the World Health Organisation itself have warned about the seriousness of the reversals in reproductive rights. In 2019, five years ago, Gestos launched the campaign "Legal abortion: don't judge, support", which highlighted the urgent need to offer support and solidarity to people who need abortions in the cases provided for by law.     There is no shortage of evidence that abortion is a public health issue and that it must be discussed considering the multiple structural inequalities faced by women, girls and people who have abortions. That is why we reject those representatives who, in the National Congress and/or in the different executive bodies, represent fundamentalism, sexism, misogyny and irresponsibility towards the people they are supposed to protect in their public functions.  For this reason, Gestos joins the different demonstrations and activities of feminist organisations, social movements and civil society: we will not stop until Bill 1904/2024 is stopped in Congress.        Gestos is a Collaborative Partner of IPPF in Brazil. Since1993 they have effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. They also help to form new civil society organizations, such as the National Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (RNPVHA - 1995), the Positive Work Group - GTP+ (2000), the Group of Positive Actions (2003), the Group of Support to HIV Positive People (GASP) 2003, Acts of Citizenship (2006). From 2007 to 2011, Gestos created and coordinated the UNGASS-AIDS Forum on Sexual and Reproductive Health, where it oversaw the implementation of agreements signed at the UN in sixteen developing countries. The UNGASS-AIDS Forum has established itself as a space for political debate on issues related to HIV and AIDS and sexual and reproductive health and rights. They are also a consultative NGO at the UN, with ECOSOC status since 2017.     

El Congreso brasileño vuelve a vulnerar los derechos de las mujeres, las niñas y las personas con útero
news_item

| 17 June 2024

Brazilian Congress once again violates the rights of women, girls and people who have abortions

Haz click aquí para leer este posicionamiento en español. Clique aqui para ler essa posição em português.   Gestos, IPPF Collaborative Partner in Brazil, expresses its deep indignation at the urgent approval of Bill 1904/2024, which equates legal abortion and homicide if performed after 22 weeks of gestation. For such a bill to pass to the plenary for a vote, without being analysed by the Commissions of the Chamber of Deputies, is a direct attack on the rights of all women, girls and people who have abortions in Brazil.   The right to abortion is permitted in Brazil in three cases: risk to the life of the pregnant woman, pregnancy resulting from rape and anencephalic fetuses. This bill, which has the support of the Chamber President, Arthur Lira, represents another serious violation of rights, increasing the conditions of suffering and impotence. It is unjust, ineffective and will cause further damage to the health (including mental) of women, girls and pregnant people.  In Brazil, about 60% of rape cases occur against girls up to the age of 14. According to the Unified Health System (SUS), in 2022 there were more than 17,000 pregnancies of girls up to 14 years old, which represents an average of 39 girls giving birth every day. Data indicates that girls take longer to realise the violence they have suffered, most often committed by male family members, and do not immediately identify the pregnancy.   Brazil is already considered a country that has failed to guarantee the right to legal abortion. The last Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of Brazil conducted by the UN Human Rights Committee in September 2023 expressed serious concern about the violation of access to legal abortion in the country. Several recommendations made to the country call for the repeal of laws that criminalise people in need of legal abortion and the health professionals who assist them.  Civil society organisations, research institutes and the World Health Organisation itself have warned about the seriousness of the reversals in reproductive rights. In 2019, five years ago, Gestos launched the campaign "Legal abortion: don't judge, support", which highlighted the urgent need to offer support and solidarity to people who need abortions in the cases provided for by law.     There is no shortage of evidence that abortion is a public health issue and that it must be discussed considering the multiple structural inequalities faced by women, girls and people who have abortions. That is why we reject those representatives who, in the National Congress and/or in the different executive bodies, represent fundamentalism, sexism, misogyny and irresponsibility towards the people they are supposed to protect in their public functions.  For this reason, Gestos joins the different demonstrations and activities of feminist organisations, social movements and civil society: we will not stop until Bill 1904/2024 is stopped in Congress.        Gestos is a Collaborative Partner of IPPF in Brazil. Since1993 they have effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. They also help to form new civil society organizations, such as the National Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (RNPVHA - 1995), the Positive Work Group - GTP+ (2000), the Group of Positive Actions (2003), the Group of Support to HIV Positive People (GASP) 2003, Acts of Citizenship (2006). From 2007 to 2011, Gestos created and coordinated the UNGASS-AIDS Forum on Sexual and Reproductive Health, where it oversaw the implementation of agreements signed at the UN in sixteen developing countries. The UNGASS-AIDS Forum has established itself as a space for political debate on issues related to HIV and AIDS and sexual and reproductive health and rights. They are also a consultative NGO at the UN, with ECOSOC status since 2017.     

IPPF May News
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| 31 May 2024

May News Round-Up

Haz click aquí para leer el Resumen de noticias de mayo en español. Brazil | Gestos celebrates 31 years of advocating for SRHR   Gestos, IPPF Collaborative Partner in Brazil, celebrated their 31st anniversary with dance, music and much love from their community. Since their founding, they have advocated to link social, cultural, economic and environmental issues to inclusive and effective public policies on sexual and reproductive health and rights.  For 31 years, Gestos has effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. Around 70 per cent of the people who have sought legal support from the institution have had their rights repaired, through injunctions and judgements. Gestos' advocacy efforts effectively reach multilateral bodies dedicated to monitoring HIV, gender, sexual rights and public development policies and, since 2001, the organisation has been monitoring United Nations resolutions on these agendas.  Congratulations, parceiras!       Bolivia | Colectivo Rebeldía celebrates diverse 🏳️‍🌈 🏳️‍⚧️ families for IDAHOBIT  To commemorate the International Day Against LGBTIphobia, Colectivo Rebeldía,  Collaborative Partner in Bolivia, joined the Sexual Diversity Movement of Santa Cruz to celebrate love and diversity on May 17th. They brought the community together to celebrate all forms of love and all forms of families. The cold weather was no obstacle to this warm and welcoming gathering where they shared moments of reflection, art and connection.  You can learn more about this joint project with their most recent (and creative!) post.      Cuba | Cenesex fights LGBTQI-Phobia with gala, march and community-oriented events  IPPF Collaborative Partner in Cuba, Cenesex, went all out for IDAHOBIT celebrations with the Cuban Days Against Homophobia and Transphobia during the month of May. They took the streets to the rhythm of the Cuban Conga against Homophobia and Transphobia, waving the trans and transinclusive pride flag across San José de las Lajas. They also celebrated the graduation of 30 transgender people as Sexual Health and Rights promoters in prisons. Their community work is incredible!      Dominica | Dominica Planned Parenthood Association champions gender equality at SIDS4  From May 27-30 the Dominican Planned Parenthood Association participated in the 4th International Conference on Small Island Developing States. This year, Antigua & Barbuda was host to leaders from the 39 independent States and 18 Associate Members of United Nations regional commissions and other world leaders, officials, and experts from the private sector, academia and civil society. DPPA participated in the Gender Equality Forum as part of the SIDS4, bringing forward the importance of addressing gender-based violence.      Haïti | The Association of Midwifes of Haiti highlights the important role of midwives at the forefront of crisis.   To celebrate the International Day of the Midwife, on May 6th the Association des Sages-Femmes d’Haïti (ASFH) organized the webinar “Midwives in Haïti: Agents of Solution in the Socio-political Crisis”, of particular importance in the country’s current context. Key stakeholders came together to discuss best practices, challenges and solutions to strengthen maternal and child health in the country. It was a relevant virtual platform for reflection, exchange of ideas and collective action.      Perú | INPPARES and IPPF ACRO express concern regarding the latest Health Ministry’s decree that violates LGBTQI+ rights.  The IPPF Americas and Caribbean Regional Office joined INPPARES, IPPF Member Association in Peru, in expressing its rejection of the Supreme Decree Nº 009-2024-SA issued on May 10th by the Peruvian Ministry of Health which, by updating the Essential Health Insurance Plan (PEAS) based on the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), violates the human rights of LGBTIQ+ people.  This decision of the Peruvian government to use ICD-10 is very serious, as it violates binding codes and agreements at local, regional and international level. You can read our joint statement here.     If you want to receive SRHR news directly from the ground to your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter Rising the Tide: Subscribe

IPPF May News
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| 31 May 2024

May News Round-Up

Haz click aquí para leer el Resumen de noticias de mayo en español. Brazil | Gestos celebrates 31 years of advocating for SRHR   Gestos, IPPF Collaborative Partner in Brazil, celebrated their 31st anniversary with dance, music and much love from their community. Since their founding, they have advocated to link social, cultural, economic and environmental issues to inclusive and effective public policies on sexual and reproductive health and rights.  For 31 years, Gestos has effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. Around 70 per cent of the people who have sought legal support from the institution have had their rights repaired, through injunctions and judgements. Gestos' advocacy efforts effectively reach multilateral bodies dedicated to monitoring HIV, gender, sexual rights and public development policies and, since 2001, the organisation has been monitoring United Nations resolutions on these agendas.  Congratulations, parceiras!       Bolivia | Colectivo Rebeldía celebrates diverse 🏳️‍🌈 🏳️‍⚧️ families for IDAHOBIT  To commemorate the International Day Against LGBTIphobia, Colectivo Rebeldía,  Collaborative Partner in Bolivia, joined the Sexual Diversity Movement of Santa Cruz to celebrate love and diversity on May 17th. They brought the community together to celebrate all forms of love and all forms of families. The cold weather was no obstacle to this warm and welcoming gathering where they shared moments of reflection, art and connection.  You can learn more about this joint project with their most recent (and creative!) post.      Cuba | Cenesex fights LGBTQI-Phobia with gala, march and community-oriented events  IPPF Collaborative Partner in Cuba, Cenesex, went all out for IDAHOBIT celebrations with the Cuban Days Against Homophobia and Transphobia during the month of May. They took the streets to the rhythm of the Cuban Conga against Homophobia and Transphobia, waving the trans and transinclusive pride flag across San José de las Lajas. They also celebrated the graduation of 30 transgender people as Sexual Health and Rights promoters in prisons. Their community work is incredible!      Dominica | Dominica Planned Parenthood Association champions gender equality at SIDS4  From May 27-30 the Dominican Planned Parenthood Association participated in the 4th International Conference on Small Island Developing States. This year, Antigua & Barbuda was host to leaders from the 39 independent States and 18 Associate Members of United Nations regional commissions and other world leaders, officials, and experts from the private sector, academia and civil society. DPPA participated in the Gender Equality Forum as part of the SIDS4, bringing forward the importance of addressing gender-based violence.      Haïti | The Association of Midwifes of Haiti highlights the important role of midwives at the forefront of crisis.   To celebrate the International Day of the Midwife, on May 6th the Association des Sages-Femmes d’Haïti (ASFH) organized the webinar “Midwives in Haïti: Agents of Solution in the Socio-political Crisis”, of particular importance in the country’s current context. Key stakeholders came together to discuss best practices, challenges and solutions to strengthen maternal and child health in the country. It was a relevant virtual platform for reflection, exchange of ideas and collective action.      Perú | INPPARES and IPPF ACRO express concern regarding the latest Health Ministry’s decree that violates LGBTQI+ rights.  The IPPF Americas and Caribbean Regional Office joined INPPARES, IPPF Member Association in Peru, in expressing its rejection of the Supreme Decree Nº 009-2024-SA issued on May 10th by the Peruvian Ministry of Health which, by updating the Essential Health Insurance Plan (PEAS) based on the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), violates the human rights of LGBTIQ+ people.  This decision of the Peruvian government to use ICD-10 is very serious, as it violates binding codes and agreements at local, regional and international level. You can read our joint statement here.     If you want to receive SRHR news directly from the ground to your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter Rising the Tide: Subscribe

Inundaciones en Rio Grande do Sul: una mirada sobre las mujeres y el cambio climático
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| 16 May 2024

Floods in Rio Grande do Sul: a look at women and climate change

Clique aqui para ler em português. Click aquí para leer en español.   Gestos expresses deep solidarity and concern about the current situation faced by the state of Rio Grande do Sul. We know that climate disasters disproportionately affect populations in situations of social vulnerability and these circumstances demand, more than ever, a watchful eye and firm gestures to guarantee rights. Based on the lessons learned, it is urgent to move towards the implementation of effective public policies that protect people in situations of humanitarian crises as intense as the one experienced these days in the south of the country. Thus, it was with great indignation and concern that we became aware of the cases of sexual abuse of women displaced by the catastrophe in shelters, all of them under 18 years of age. As has been proven and documented in similar situations, what has happened raises the alarm that official complaints represent only a small fraction of the cases of harassment that have occurred. Sexual violence related to climate events has long been documented and its prevention requires immediate attention from local authorities. It is widely known and has been discussed in various international spaces with data showing that humanitarian responses require a gendered approach, requiring protective measures to be put in place. UN data already shows that women are 14 times more likely to die in climate disasters than men. There is no lack of evidence, but once again the attention of the public authorities to the situation of women has been lacking. This is unacceptable and the extreme vulnerability of women and girls to climate change has been highlighted by civil society organisations, including Gestos, and by different UN agencies in multilateral forums. In times of tragedy, solidarity manifests itself, but there are also gaps for multiple violations. Reports from partners living in the state also indicate the neglect of the protection of people's sexual and reproductive rights, as well as episodes of transphobia, the breakdown of secrecy about HIV status and the adoption of segregating and stigmatising strategies during the crisis, such as the forced separation of people affected by tuberculosis in specific places. Concern must go beyond the structural and material reconstruction of the state. It is urgent to allocate resources to develop a contingency plan capable of mitigating the impacts of the crisis on populations - impacts that are not yet measurable.   Gestos remains available to contribute in whatever way possible to strengthen this powerful network of support and solidarity. You too can contribute by consulting the list of serious partnerships that have made a difference in the lives of hundreds of people.   How to help:   Gestos is a Collaborative Partner of IPPF in Brazil. Since1993 they have effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. They also help to form new civil society organizations, such as the National Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (RNPVHA - 1995), the Positive Work Group - GTP+ (2000), the Group of Positive Actions (2003), the Group of Support to HIV Positive People (GASP) 2003, Acts of Citizenship (2006). From 2007 to 2011, Gestos created and coordinated the UNGASS-AIDS Forum on Sexual and Reproductive Health, where it oversaw the implementation of agreements signed at the UN in sixteen developing countries. The UNGASS-AIDS Forum has established itself as a space for political debate on issues related to HIV and AIDS and sexual and reproductive health and rights. They are also a consultative NGO at the UN, with ECOSOC status since 2017.

Inundaciones en Rio Grande do Sul: una mirada sobre las mujeres y el cambio climático
news_item

| 16 May 2024

Floods in Rio Grande do Sul: a look at women and climate change

Clique aqui para ler em português. Click aquí para leer en español.   Gestos expresses deep solidarity and concern about the current situation faced by the state of Rio Grande do Sul. We know that climate disasters disproportionately affect populations in situations of social vulnerability and these circumstances demand, more than ever, a watchful eye and firm gestures to guarantee rights. Based on the lessons learned, it is urgent to move towards the implementation of effective public policies that protect people in situations of humanitarian crises as intense as the one experienced these days in the south of the country. Thus, it was with great indignation and concern that we became aware of the cases of sexual abuse of women displaced by the catastrophe in shelters, all of them under 18 years of age. As has been proven and documented in similar situations, what has happened raises the alarm that official complaints represent only a small fraction of the cases of harassment that have occurred. Sexual violence related to climate events has long been documented and its prevention requires immediate attention from local authorities. It is widely known and has been discussed in various international spaces with data showing that humanitarian responses require a gendered approach, requiring protective measures to be put in place. UN data already shows that women are 14 times more likely to die in climate disasters than men. There is no lack of evidence, but once again the attention of the public authorities to the situation of women has been lacking. This is unacceptable and the extreme vulnerability of women and girls to climate change has been highlighted by civil society organisations, including Gestos, and by different UN agencies in multilateral forums. In times of tragedy, solidarity manifests itself, but there are also gaps for multiple violations. Reports from partners living in the state also indicate the neglect of the protection of people's sexual and reproductive rights, as well as episodes of transphobia, the breakdown of secrecy about HIV status and the adoption of segregating and stigmatising strategies during the crisis, such as the forced separation of people affected by tuberculosis in specific places. Concern must go beyond the structural and material reconstruction of the state. It is urgent to allocate resources to develop a contingency plan capable of mitigating the impacts of the crisis on populations - impacts that are not yet measurable.   Gestos remains available to contribute in whatever way possible to strengthen this powerful network of support and solidarity. You too can contribute by consulting the list of serious partnerships that have made a difference in the lives of hundreds of people.   How to help:   Gestos is a Collaborative Partner of IPPF in Brazil. Since1993 they have effectively contributed to guaranteeing the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS. They also help to form new civil society organizations, such as the National Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (RNPVHA - 1995), the Positive Work Group - GTP+ (2000), the Group of Positive Actions (2003), the Group of Support to HIV Positive People (GASP) 2003, Acts of Citizenship (2006). From 2007 to 2011, Gestos created and coordinated the UNGASS-AIDS Forum on Sexual and Reproductive Health, where it oversaw the implementation of agreements signed at the UN in sixteen developing countries. The UNGASS-AIDS Forum has established itself as a space for political debate on issues related to HIV and AIDS and sexual and reproductive health and rights. They are also a consultative NGO at the UN, with ECOSOC status since 2017.

In powerful speech, IPPF urges governments to deliver on the ICPD’s Programme of Action at the 57th Commission on Population and Development
news item

| 06 May 2024

IPPF urges governments to deliver on the ICPD’s Programme of Action

Para ver este contenido en español, haz click aquí. During the 57th Commission on Population and Development, Eugenia López Uribe, Regional Director at IPPF Americas and the Caribbean, delivered an oral statement to exhort governments to invest on realising the International Conference on Population and Development’s Programme of Action, signed in 1994 in Cairo, Egypt.     Watch the oral statement here. “Thirty years ago, the world looked more promising – Nelson Mandela was to be elected President of South Africa. The internet was created. Israel signed an accord with Palestinians. Although, still, there was war in Europe, climate change was wreaking havoc, women and girls were experiencing violence, dying from preventable maternal mortality, and being denied full autonomy.   Today, despite progress and additional international commitments, the data from SDG indicators shows that globally only 56% of women can make decisions about their sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights; one in five are married before the age of 18,2 and 1 in 3 experience sexual or GVB in their lifetime, mostly from an intimate partner; more than one billion have unmet needs for family planning; half of all pregnancies, 121 million/ year, are unintended.   Reductions in maternal mortality have worsened since 2016. Multiple ongoing crises including climate change, exacerbated the impact of deprioritized, insufficient SRH services, particularly in conflict situations.   Although decision-makers know what needs to be done – there is an abundance of evidence before us – both policy implementation and adequate resourcing of the ICPD PoA is falling short of the goals set in 1994.   At this critical moment for the UN system, we see strong attacks against the 2030 Agenda and the long-held consensus that reproductive rights are human rights and a matter of development. Those trying to undermine these rights are aligned with those trying to undermine democracy, science, civic space and the multilateral system itself. The global community must stop them to continue using human rights as a weapon, instead of a shield, institutionalizing discrimination and hatred into laws and communities, and slowing global progress in areas like maternal mortality and HIV, where we see an increase for adolescent girls.   The ICPD PoA is essential to any Post-2030 future, but it requires adequate financing and system-wide policy coherence and coordination amongst all stakeholders at national and international levels: the ODA commitments must be fulfilled; the elimination of systemic barriers and the promotion of integrated rights must guide the economic policies, mainstreaming gender and race equality and environmental integrity.   And young people, feminists, adolescents, and civil society must be guaranteed space to be heard at national, as well at the UN levels; the populations who have been pushed furthest behind must be prioritized.   We welcome that Member States reaffirmed at the UN their support for the ICPD 30 years on. But we also call on you to increase the speed to make this agenda a reality: you can do better to protect the rights of women, girls, adolescents, and young people in all our diversity. It is our lives, our bodies that pay the price of inaction, or not enough action, and we have paid it for long enough.”  IPPF ACRO is deeply committed to the realisation of the ICPD’s Programme of Action and will continue to meaningfully engage in spaces like the Commission on Population and Development to drive governments and stakeholder to factually deliver on guaranteeing human rights for all.    

In powerful speech, IPPF urges governments to deliver on the ICPD’s Programme of Action at the 57th Commission on Population and Development
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| 02 May 2024

IPPF urges governments to deliver on the ICPD’s Programme of Action

Para ver este contenido en español, haz click aquí. During the 57th Commission on Population and Development, Eugenia López Uribe, Regional Director at IPPF Americas and the Caribbean, delivered an oral statement to exhort governments to invest on realising the International Conference on Population and Development’s Programme of Action, signed in 1994 in Cairo, Egypt.     Watch the oral statement here. “Thirty years ago, the world looked more promising – Nelson Mandela was to be elected President of South Africa. The internet was created. Israel signed an accord with Palestinians. Although, still, there was war in Europe, climate change was wreaking havoc, women and girls were experiencing violence, dying from preventable maternal mortality, and being denied full autonomy.   Today, despite progress and additional international commitments, the data from SDG indicators shows that globally only 56% of women can make decisions about their sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights; one in five are married before the age of 18,2 and 1 in 3 experience sexual or GVB in their lifetime, mostly from an intimate partner; more than one billion have unmet needs for family planning; half of all pregnancies, 121 million/ year, are unintended.   Reductions in maternal mortality have worsened since 2016. Multiple ongoing crises including climate change, exacerbated the impact of deprioritized, insufficient SRH services, particularly in conflict situations.   Although decision-makers know what needs to be done – there is an abundance of evidence before us – both policy implementation and adequate resourcing of the ICPD PoA is falling short of the goals set in 1994.   At this critical moment for the UN system, we see strong attacks against the 2030 Agenda and the long-held consensus that reproductive rights are human rights and a matter of development. Those trying to undermine these rights are aligned with those trying to undermine democracy, science, civic space and the multilateral system itself. The global community must stop them to continue using human rights as a weapon, instead of a shield, institutionalizing discrimination and hatred into laws and communities, and slowing global progress in areas like maternal mortality and HIV, where we see an increase for adolescent girls.   The ICPD PoA is essential to any Post-2030 future, but it requires adequate financing and system-wide policy coherence and coordination amongst all stakeholders at national and international levels: the ODA commitments must be fulfilled; the elimination of systemic barriers and the promotion of integrated rights must guide the economic policies, mainstreaming gender and race equality and environmental integrity.   And young people, feminists, adolescents, and civil society must be guaranteed space to be heard at national, as well at the UN levels; the populations who have been pushed furthest behind must be prioritized.   We welcome that Member States reaffirmed at the UN their support for the ICPD 30 years on. But we also call on you to increase the speed to make this agenda a reality: you can do better to protect the rights of women, girls, adolescents, and young people in all our diversity. It is our lives, our bodies that pay the price of inaction, or not enough action, and we have paid it for long enough.”  IPPF ACRO is deeply committed to the realisation of the ICPD’s Programme of Action and will continue to meaningfully engage in spaces like the Commission on Population and Development to drive governments and stakeholder to factually deliver on guaranteeing human rights for all.    

April News Round-Up
news item

| 06 May 2024

April News Round-Up

Haz click aquí para leer esta entrada en español. ACRO Youth Network participated in the Workshop Planning and Advocacy facilitated by FP2030 Latin America and the Caribbean Hub    Ela Urquijo, ACRO Youth Networker and Nikoli Edwards, Youth Officer at the Family Planning Association of Trinidad and Tobago attended FP2030 LAC Hub's Planning and Advocacy Workshop where they explored and learnt about sexual and reproductive rights from different perspectives and sectors.  IPPF ACRO Youth Network is the network of young volunteers that engage together to fight for sexual and reproductive rights in the Americas and the Caribbean. Each member of the IPPF ACRO Youth Network is also part of IPPF’s Member Association in their country. Join them in their activism for SRHR here.  FP2030 is a global alliance to empower women, young women, adolescents, and girls through the mobilization of family planning policies, investments and actions based on the sexual and reproductive rights policies, investments and actions. The Latin America and the Caribbean Hub is hosted by Profamilia Colombia and Save the Children.     Collaborative Partner in Argentina joins thousands in standing up for free and accessible education    Fundheg, Collaborative Partner in Argentina, joined the public marches in support of the Public Universities in their country. They raised their voices against the economic and financial adjustments proposed by the national government, which endanger the right of young people to have access to public higher education of excellence, without fees and with free admission.  These financial adjustments are part of a series of decrees and changes proposed by the Federal Government which intend to hinder the advancement of human rights in the country.     IPPF ACRO participates in the VII Latin America and the Caribbean Countries Forum on Sustainable Development    IPPF ACRO participated in the Latin America and the Caribbean Countries Forum and co-hosted the event “Climate Change and Health: the double challenge of our time” where Eugenia López Uribe, Regional Director of IPPF Americas and the Caribbean stressed the linkages between Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and Climate Change.    The effects of the climate crisis become barriers to people's access to sexual and reproductive health services, such as contraception, access to safe abortion, and pregnancy care, to name a few. Together with Gestos, Collaborative Partner in Brazil, UNAIDS, the CSO Working Group on 2030 Agenda and Fiocruz Foundation, IPPF ACRO positioned SRHR as vital to address climate change.    Saint Vincent Planned Parenthood Association hosts fundraising event for children   In efforts to support children who face challenges in accessing school supplies and essentials such as stationary, backpacks, hygiene kits and uniforms the St Vincent Planned Parenthood Association hosted a fundraising BBQ. SVPPA recognizes that education is the cornerstone of a bright future and launched this heartfelt fundraising to support children struggling with education supplies.     If you want to receive SRHR news directly from the ground to your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter "Rising the Tide"!

April News Round-Up
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| 30 April 2024

April News Round-Up

Haz click aquí para leer esta entrada en español. ACRO Youth Network participated in the Workshop Planning and Advocacy facilitated by FP2030 Latin America and the Caribbean Hub    Ela Urquijo, ACRO Youth Networker and Nikoli Edwards, Youth Officer at the Family Planning Association of Trinidad and Tobago attended FP2030 LAC Hub's Planning and Advocacy Workshop where they explored and learnt about sexual and reproductive rights from different perspectives and sectors.  IPPF ACRO Youth Network is the network of young volunteers that engage together to fight for sexual and reproductive rights in the Americas and the Caribbean. Each member of the IPPF ACRO Youth Network is also part of IPPF’s Member Association in their country. Join them in their activism for SRHR here.  FP2030 is a global alliance to empower women, young women, adolescents, and girls through the mobilization of family planning policies, investments and actions based on the sexual and reproductive rights policies, investments and actions. The Latin America and the Caribbean Hub is hosted by Profamilia Colombia and Save the Children.     Collaborative Partner in Argentina joins thousands in standing up for free and accessible education    Fundheg, Collaborative Partner in Argentina, joined the public marches in support of the Public Universities in their country. They raised their voices against the economic and financial adjustments proposed by the national government, which endanger the right of young people to have access to public higher education of excellence, without fees and with free admission.  These financial adjustments are part of a series of decrees and changes proposed by the Federal Government which intend to hinder the advancement of human rights in the country.     IPPF ACRO participates in the VII Latin America and the Caribbean Countries Forum on Sustainable Development    IPPF ACRO participated in the Latin America and the Caribbean Countries Forum and co-hosted the event “Climate Change and Health: the double challenge of our time” where Eugenia López Uribe, Regional Director of IPPF Americas and the Caribbean stressed the linkages between Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and Climate Change.    The effects of the climate crisis become barriers to people's access to sexual and reproductive health services, such as contraception, access to safe abortion, and pregnancy care, to name a few. Together with Gestos, Collaborative Partner in Brazil, UNAIDS, the CSO Working Group on 2030 Agenda and Fiocruz Foundation, IPPF ACRO positioned SRHR as vital to address climate change.    Saint Vincent Planned Parenthood Association hosts fundraising event for children   In efforts to support children who face challenges in accessing school supplies and essentials such as stationary, backpacks, hygiene kits and uniforms the St Vincent Planned Parenthood Association hosted a fundraising BBQ. SVPPA recognizes that education is the cornerstone of a bright future and launched this heartfelt fundraising to support children struggling with education supplies.     If you want to receive SRHR news directly from the ground to your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter "Rising the Tide"!